Lessons Learned

Many of us learned a lot of very important lessons from our parents. Some of us even follow in our father’s footsteps. I know I did—in business and in life. I have a picture of my late father on my desk from when he was my age and I often ask myself, “What would my dad do?” 

I wanted to leave a legacy for my two sons and I began writing out the lessons I learned the hard way and I turned them into a blog called, “What Would Jimmy Buffett Do: A Parent Looks at Fifty”. The blog is inspired by the book, “A Pirate Looks at Fifty” by Jimmy Buffett and like the book, I didn’t hold back on what’s worked and what hasn’t in my life so I can hopefully help others.

I wanted to leave a legacy for my two sons and I began writing out the lessons I learned the hard way and I turned them into a blog called, “What Would Jimmy Buffett Do: A Parent Looks at Fifty”. The blog is inspired by the book, “A Pirate Looks at Fifty” by Jimmy Buffett and like the book, I didn’t hold back on what’s worked and what hasn’t in my life so I can hopefully help others.

Link to Buffett-Inspired Blog: https://whatwouldjimmybuffettdo.wordpress.com/

Lessons Learned

Up in Down Times

It’s been a weird year. Many good things have happened, but there have also been some bad things a well. To stay upbeat during the down times I started offering a daily dose of happiness. You can see the slides I’ve posted so far that feature simple ways to bring joy, calm, and happiness into everyone’s lives using the links to Pinterest and Facebook.

Link: https://www.pinterest.com/leesilber/daily-dose-of-happiness/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lee.silber

Up in Down Times

Talking Points

With all of the political speeches these past few months, it’s made me stop and think about what works best when asked to get up and speak. My son is running for Vice President of his school and asked for help with his speech, so I was able to practice what I preach. 

My advice to him (and others) is to only memorize the first sentence or two of your speech and then work from an outline. The goal is to speak from the heart, but also to stay on point during your presentation. An outline does that better than writing out your entire speech and memorizing every word.

I have over 50 tips and tricks on how to give a great speech and the mini book is free. Use the links below to request a copy or learn more. I am also available to work with anyone who wants help with their presentation or Powerpoint slides.

For a free copy of Speak Like a Pro: Leesilber@leesilber.com
To Learn More: http://www.leesilber.com/mini-books.html
Hire Lee: leesilber@leesilber.com

Talking Points

Home Again

It seems to me that more and more people prefer to be home. Better home entertainment systems means more people watch movies and sporting events in the comfort of their own home. Meals on the go and delivery services means people can eat gourmet meals without having to prepare them or leave the house. People prefer to work from home and there are more home-based businesses than ever. Even when people travel they now prefer to stay in someone else’s home instead of a hotel. I’m note sure what all this means, but it’s fascinating all the same.

Home Again

Extra Special Children

I have 22 children. Okay, not actually 22 children, but 22 books, which I think of as my kids. I am proud of them all, even though some went on to great success while others, well, didn’t. That said, the baby of the bunch, “Sunshine” is extra special. I kind of adopted this one, and promised to make sure it reached it’s full potential. Please, if you are giving anyone a book this year consider “Sunshine” as a gift. It’s a great book and appropriate for all ages.

Kindle Version only $2.99: http://tinyurl.com/h2sb872
Paperback Version only $11.00: http://tinyurl.com/h2sb872

Extra Special Children

The Art of Sleuthing

This is from an interview about how sleuthing is a lot like art.

1. In what way is sleuthing an art form?
In many art forms (painters and sculptors, for example) the artist brings things together different (and sometimes random) elements to create something new. A photographer sees things that others miss and captures it on “film”. Musicians many times must uncover what notes are being played and find a way to fit their part in. When you think about it, all of the things that makes a person an artist are similar to what makes someone a sleuth.

2. What are some personality traits make a person a good detective?
Obviously, being observant is good. Curiosity is key. A person who likes puzzles and enjoys solving problems. Being able to work well under pressure is important. It is helpful to have a good memory or be highly organized. Patience is a virtue for the detective because a lot of times there is a lot of waiting and relying on others to finish their investigations before you can complete yours. It’s better to be able to comfortably talk to strangers than have to rely on others to do it. Quick thinking is also important.

3. Is it possible to learn to become a super sleuth?
Yes. People can practice being observant on a daily basis. The more you pay attention to details (many that others miss) the better you get at it. Solving problems can also be a daily part of your routine. When something bugs you think about ways to improve the situation–even though you may never use these ideas. Interview others and ask them to tell you things that are true and some that are untrue and see if you can pick up the clues when someone is lying to you. Study Sherlock Holmes and other great detectives to see how they do it, and emulate them.

The Art of Sleuthing

Right Brain Organizing

There are a lot of mainstream organizing ideas (which are great) but I thought I would give you a couple from a different perspective–that of a right brain thinker. As the author of “Organizing From The Right Side of the Brain” (St. Martin’s Press) I think those of us who prefer to pile papers are looked down upon by those who file their papers. So . . . here’s my tips for the visual person who likes to flit from task to task and has several projects going at once.

1. Pile with a Purpose.
If you prefer to pile your papers, pile with a purpose. Create piles of things that are related and put them in a place that makes sense (a pile on your desk are urgent and a pile by the file cabinet are completed). Take a piece of card stock and fold it in half to create a tent and label your pile so others know what’s where. (It can also be a sort of table of contents.) Use colored folders so you can easily spot things within a pile. Lastly, set a height limit so once a pile gets too tall you must cut it down to size.

2. Instructions for Instructions.
It makes sense that the manual for something (a printer, television, computer) should be kept next to or under the item it goes with. Sure, you could file them away. But chances are when you need the manual you will be standing next to the malfunctioning printer, television, or appliance so simply slip the instructions underneath, taped to the back, or next to the equipment.

3. Color Me Organized
The things we use the most should be the easiest to get to and the things we almost never need are out of the way. That’s tried-and-true organizing advice. To take make this work for a right brainers, color coding is key. If we put our Halloween decorations in an orange and black tub (which are sold in the fall) and store it up and out of the way, we know in an instant what’s in that tub. If it were in a box with chicken scratch writing on the side we’d probably have to climb up and get it down just to be sure.

Right Brain Organizing